Porsche 911 Carrera Cabriolet: Redefining Entry Level

October 13, 2021
10:00 am

Porsche is redefining what entry-level means. The 2018 Porsche 911 Carrera Cabriolet is a phenomenal car that offers so much to the driver, it’s hard to believe it could be considered entry-level. It’s not just about performance either; this car has an interior that will make you feel like royalty with its top up or down! This blog post takes a closer look at what defines the Porsche 911 Carrera Cabriolet and why everyone should consider purchasing one.

What Is the Porsche 911 Carrera Cabriolet?

The term cabriolet is French, and it was first used to designate a two-seat chariot driven by a single horse in the middle of the 18th century. A cabriolet was distinguished from other two-wheeled horse-drawn vehicles by the ability of its roof to fold back, allowing passengers to travel in the open air. The first convertibles were Cabriolets.

The new Porsche 911 Carrera Cabriolet, which lacks the horse but adds a couple of rear seats, is built on the same principles. The Cabriolet shares the same engine, transmission, tires, and brakes as the standard 911 Carrera, but how different is an open-top 911 from the coupe? I had the opportunity to drive through the small villages and rolling hills south of Porsche’s home in Stuttgart, and here’s what I learned about the differences between the convertible and hardtop.

Why Buy a Porsche 911 Carrera Cabriolet?

The term cabriolet came from the French and was first used in the middle of the 18th century to describe a two-seat chariot drawn by a single horse. A cabriolet was different from other two-wheeled horse-drawn vehicles in that its roof could be folded back, giving the occupants the feeling of being in an open-air carriage. Cabriolets were the first convertibles.

The same principles apply to the new Porsche 911 Carrera Cabriolet, which lacks the horse but adds a couple of rear seats. The Cabriolet has the same engine, transmission, tires, and brakes as the standard 911 Carrera, but how does an open-top 911 differ from a coupe? I had the chance to drive through the small villages and rolling hills south of Stuttgart, and here’s what I learned about the differences between the convertible and hardtop.

The Pros and Cons of Buying a Porsche 911 Carrera Cabriolet

The Porsche 911 Carrera Cabriolet is an iconic sports car that has a sleek design and comes in some of the most luxurious colors. The downside to owning one, however, are they’re not very practical for people who need to carry more than two passengers or have children who will eventually outgrow backseat space – another downfall can be their high theft rate because these vehicles often get targeted by thieves due whose desirability means nothing less should do!

Price

The 911 Carrera is not a cheap automobile, with a starting price of $98,750 and a significant price increase for the Cabriolet. It starts at $111,550, a $12,800 premium over a comparable coupe. What’s interesting to see is how Porsche’s pricing for the 911 coupe and convertible compares to the 718 Boxster and Cayman.

The open-air 718 Boxster is mechanically identical to the 718 Cayman, simply with a folding fabric roof, as is the case with the hardtop and convertible variants of the 911. A base convertible costs only 3.6 percent more than a base coupe in the 718, at $60,250 against $58,150. The 911, on the other hand, will set you back a lot more for an open-air drive. The price of a Carrera Cabriolet is 13% higher than that of a regular Carrera.

Looks

These are all personal preferences, but I’ve always despised the way convertible 911s look. When the back of a convertible is taller than the front, it doesn’t look good to me, and the 911 Cab may be the greatest offender. The 992 cabriolet’s rear end not only sits higher than the base of the windshield but also has wider hips and a lot of visible mass under its full-width back taillight. It appears to be some kind of bulbous, ass-heavy insect, and I’m not interested.

Sounds

Do you know how you’ll roll down your windows to listen to your car scream through a tunnel? It’s similar to driving a 911 Cabriolet with the top down but much better. The Carrera’s 3.0-liter twin-turbocharged flat-six creates a lot of noise, especially with the optional sports exhaust. Wind noise is more than in the coupe, which is to be expected.

Interior, Design, & Technology

The interior of the 911 Cabriolet is identical to that of the coupe, with the exception that the roof retracts hydraulically, allowing for some open-air enjoyment. The roof may be raised or lowered in 13 seconds by pressing a button on the center console, and it can be done while driving at speeds of up to 31 mph.

There’s also a wind deflector behind the front seats that does a fantastic job of preventing buffeting within the cabin at high speeds. Anyone sitting in a pre-facelift 991-generation car will recognize the cabin arrangement, which features a high dashboard and a cossetting center console that focuses on the driver. The material quality is outstanding, and there is a surprising amount of space for a sports car.

Efficiency

The coupe is the way to go if eking out the last fraction of a mile from every drop of petrol is your jam. The EPA hasn’t released its findings yet. However, the Cabriolet loses a little fuel economy based on the New European Driving Cycle (NEDC). How insignificant is it? The coupe gets 26.14 mpg while the Cabriolet gets 25.57 mpg after converting Porsche’s values from liters per kilometer to miles per gallon.

Safety

Porsches are not crash-tested by the Insurance Institute for Highway Safety or the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration due to their low volume.

The 911 Carrera is equipped with six airbags, including two front airbags and two-piece side-impact airbags on each side. A torso airbag is activated by the seatback, while a head-protection airbag is activated by the door rather than the ceiling. This provides head protection to the Cabriolet variant, which is lacking in certain convertibles.

Speed And Acceleration

The coupe is a smidge faster at top speed and a smidge quicker to accelerate for the same reasons the 911 cabriolet is a smidge less efficient than the fixed-roof coupe (additional weight and impaired aerodynamics). According to Porsche, the coupe will reach 182 mph, but the convertible will only reach “barely” 180 mph.

The coupe beats the Cabriolet by 0.2 seconds in the sprint to 60 mph. The Carrera will reach 60 mph in 4.0 seconds, while the cabbie will take 4.2 seconds. The Sport Chrono kit reduces the 0-60 time of each car by 0.2 seconds.

Remember, though, that the impression of speed, not the speed itself, is one of the finest reasons to drive a convertible. The Carrera Cabriolet isn’t nearly as speedy as the coupe, but it feels just as thrilling with the wind in your hair and the engine note in your ears.

Where Can I Find More Information About the Porsche 911 Carrera Cabriolet?

There are plenty of resources on the internet, but if you want to find out more about this car and what it has to offer, Porsche is an excellent source for information. You can also go to YouTube and check out some reviews from other users who have already bought one. The most popular videos will give you a better idea and insight into how others view the vehicle.

Conclusion

The Porsche 911 Carrera Cabriolet is a vehicle that redefines what it means to be entry-level and why everyone should consider purchasing one. Its beauty, power, and performance are unparalleled in the world of luxury vehicles today. If you’re looking for something new or just want an upgrade from your current car/ SUV, this may be the perfect option for you!

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